Garden

Tree peony


Question: tree peony


Hi, I own a large 28-year-old tree peony, bought in China, it is located in a favorable place in terms of sunshine and fertility of the soil, but it has never bloomed, not even the new plant I created separating it. Why do you recommend? Thanks so much.

Answer: tree peony


Dear Lori,
unfortunately your problem is more common than you think, because peonies, even if they are quite robust plants, present a series of problems that can make sporadic blooms; strange is the fact that your plant has never produced flowers, because even if some climatic or cultivation conditions may be unsuitable for the development of this plant, it is highly unlikely that the combination of unfortunate events will be repeated afterwards for 28 years . Usually one of the main reasons why one tree peony does not bloom is constituted by the fact that the shrub is still young, some shrubs also take 4-5 years before producing the buds, because they use their energies to produce branches and leaves. Other reasons are related to the amount of sunlight received, although in fact from what you say it should not be your problem, also considering that the plant, after 28 years of cultivation in an excessively or poorly sunny position, to date not only not it should flower, but it should also show other symptoms; but in any case, peonies love bright, partially shaded positions, with the sun in the early hours of the evening, less in the afternoon. However, these are shrubs that tend to adapt quite well to sun exposure, surviving without problems even in direct sunlight, if provided with adequate watering. If we place a tree peony in a dark area and completely without sunlight, dark and shaded, then the probability of getting flowers is very remote. Also the fertility of the soil is important, but even here, if for 28 years we grow a tree peony in a heavy, compact and scarcely fertile soil, the result, besides not having flowers, will be an asphyxiated plant, without new foliage, which it survives rather than vegetate. Perhaps your problem is linked to a strong presence of nitrogen in the soil (generally due to nitrogen-rich fertilizers, and poor in phosphorus, potassium and microelements); fertilizations supplied in random periods, carried out with fertilizers consisting mainly of nitrogen, can cause flower shortages, because the plant tends to use nitrogen to produce green parts, or foliage and new shoots, and then it is then exhausted and no longer has the energies for pruning. A case of this kind is decidedly limited, and in fact this problem often affects potted plants rather than those in open ground. Another problem that causes shortage or lack of flowers is pruning; herbaceous peonies usually, in summer, are pruned at ground level, and the aerial part, however, dries up when autumn arrives. The arboreal peons, on the other hand, do not like pruning, especially because the floral buds are prepared already in autumn, and so if we go to shorten the branches at the end of winter, we are also going to remove all the floral gems, which are precisely at the apex of the branches .